Common Warning Signs of Online Scams

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Unexpected requests for money in return for delivery of a package, often with a sense of urgency.
Requests for personal and/or financial information.
Links to misspelled or slightly altered Web-site addresses (fedx.com, fed-ex.com, etc.)
Spelling and grammatical errors or excessive use of capitalization and exclamation points.
Claims that you have won a large sum of money in a lottery or settlement.
Certificate errors or lack of SSL for sensitive activities.

Online fraud typically takes the form of fraudulent e-mails and Web sites. These forged means of communication often use corporate logos, colours and legal disclaimers to make them appear authentic.

Fraudulent E-Mails
Fraudulent e-mails are the most common avenue of online scams. A "spoofed" e-mail is one that purports to be from a reputable source in an attempt to trick you into divulging personal or account information, sending payment, or otherwise taking an action that will result in fraud. These attacks are common because they are low-tech and can be easily deployed on a massive scale. Even though the warning signs are there, "phishing" and scam e-mails continue to fool people.

Spoofed Web sites
Spoofed Web sites, like phishing e-mails, pretend to represent a reputable source, such as FedEx, when in reality they are operated by criminals attempting to commit theft. Spoofed Web sites are often used in conjunction with phishing e-mails. Spoof Web sites allow scammers to collect user-names, passwords, Social Security numbers, credit card details and more. Many spoofed sites even allow users to log in, giving them a false sense of security.

FedEx does not request, via unsolicited mail or e-mail, payment or personal information in return for goods in transit or in FedEx custody.

Most larger companies have e:mail addresses the spoof mails can be forwarded to:

If you have received a fraudulent e-mail that claims to be from FedEx, you can report it by forwarding it to abuse@fedex.com

Comments

Comment: 

I received a phone call last week.  A man with a difficult to understand accent said he was from some technical company I couldn’t make out.  He told me that my computer was at risk from suspicious programmes and he told me to go and switch my computer on.  I told him all was well and that I didn’t want to pursue the conversation.  He became a bit pushy and I said a firm goodbye. The number that came up on my caller ID was 01347 810588 – I have informed Fairlop SNT

Comment: 
HELLO DEAR,
 
I AM MISS SARENA QUADIO FROM IVORY COAST AND I AM CONTACTING YOU BECAUSE I NEED YOUR HELP IN THE MANAGEMENT OF A SUM OF MONEY THAT MY FATHER LEFT FOR ME BEFORE HE DIED,THIS MONEY IS  10.3 MILLION AMERICAN  U .S . DOLLARS AND THE MONEY IS IN A BANK HERE IN ABIDJAN .
 
MY FATHER WAS A VERY RICH COCOA FARMER AND HE WAS POISONED BY HIS BUSINESS COLLEAGUES AND NOW I WANT YOU TO STAND AS MY GUIDIAN AND APPOINTED BENEFICIARY AND RECEIVE THE MONEY IN YOUR COUNTRY SINCE I AM ONLY 19 YEARS AND WITHOUT MOTHER OR FATHER.
YOU WILL BE ENTITLED TO 30% OF THE TOTAL  AMOUNT AS YOUR COMMISSION AFTER THE TRANSACTION.
 
PLEASE I WILL LIKE YOU TO REPLY TO THIS SO THAT I WILL TELL YOU ALL THE INFORMATION SO THAT MY MONEY WILL BE TRANSFER INTO YOUR BANK ACCOUNT SO THAT YOU WILL GET ME PAPERS TO TRAVEL TO YOUR COUNTRY TO CONTINUE MY EDUCATION THERE WHILE YOU HELP ME INVEST MY MONEY UNTIL I FINISH MY EDUCA TION.
 
I AM WAITING FOR YOUR URGENT REPLY.
THANKS. FROM
SARENA QUADIO